BOOKNOTES: FREIHEIT!: THE WHITE ROSE GRAPHIC NOVEL

  FREIHEIT!: THE WHITE ROSE GRAPHIC NOVEL Andrea Grosso Ciponte (Plough Publishing House, 2021, 111 pages, hardcover, $24) Reviewed by Ellen Wilson Fielding In this beautifully illustrated graphic novel, Italian artist and author Andrea Grosso Ciponte conveys the courage and...
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Perambulating in Mid-Air?

Many years ago, when I was pregnant with my first child, I ran into a fellow Sunday School teacher one day who congratulated me on my soon-tobe-born baby. As he turned to leave, he casually mentioned that he would pray it was a boy. Startled, I didn’t know what to reply. Of...
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What Happens Should Roe Go?

  The Supreme Court’s decision to take up in its next session Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the suit brought against the 2018 Mississippi law limiting abortions to the first 15 weeks of pregnancy, can’t help but raise heady hopes in prolifers eager for good...
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Waiting for Dobbs

  I have been reading The Mystery of the Charity of Joan of Arc, a play that French poet Charles Peguy wrote more than a century ago. For the French especially, Joan of Arc’s life and death are an inspiring patriotic touchstone to return to in times of national crisis or...
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When There Is No King

I have been doing a slow walk through J.R.R. Tolkien’s Silmarillion in concert with a Tolkien podcast; concurrently, I am moving through the Old Testament books of Joshua and Judges, accompanied by Fr. Mike Schmitz’s Bible in a Year podcast. The experiences are weirdly similar....
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Rights Talk and Abortion

I was in my teens when the move to legalize abortion in New York State stirred private and public debates on the topic and precipitated my own interest in defending the unborn’s right to life. Over time assisted suicide joined the list of pro-life issues, as state legislatures...
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Waiting for Dobbs

I have been reading The Mystery of the Charity of Joan of Arc, a play that French poet Charles Peguy wrote more than a century ago. For the French especially, Joan of Arc’s life and death are an inspiring patriotic touchstone to return to in times of national crisis or...
Read More →

Quantifying the Unquantifiable

What if we could know—perhaps through a prophetic vision or an exquisitely refined predictive algorithm—that a particular human fetus developing in the womb of a particular abortion-seeking woman would, if rescued from prenatal death, grow up to be a source of human misery on a...
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On-screen Characters/Off-screen Life

The standard response to these “what ifs” is that a sitcom is light comedy that attempts to appeal to its contemporary audience, perhaps in part by steering clear of deeper matters, particularly those that might divide and alienate viewers. And in this Friends resembles most of...
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The Sorry State of Love and Marriage

  I had just started high school at the beginning of the Seventies when Erich Segal’s best-selling tearjerker Love Story and its theater-filling movie version were released to harrow the souls of the romantic. Segal had set out to write an elemental love story in a...
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